Dog

Rhodesian Ridgeback Dog

Origin

The Rhodesian Ridgeback has, as its name suggests, originated in Rhodesia, but in South Africa. It evolved from the mixture of native Hottentot hunting dog, which had a crest of hair on the back different, with different races (Bloodhound, Greyhound, Mastiff, Mastiff, Saluki, and others have proposed) that accompanied the first immigrants Europeans in South Africa. The aim was to create a dog that could hunt, which is very important and courageous enough to protect the home, family and livestock against predators and intruders were resistant to local diseases, could last several days and frosty nights warm and providing the faithful of the company. In the 1870s some of these dogs were taken to Rhodesia, where race has prospered and has been developed by careful breeding programs. In Rhodesia have become popular among the hunters of lion and leopard and bought another Lion Dog African name. The Ridgeback has been found that excellent trail and tracking capabilities, speed to continue his career and courage, agility and intelligence to keep a big cat at a distance until the hunter arrived to dispatch. In 1922, the breed club was established first in Southern Rhodesia and a breed standard developed to stimulate the formation of the breeders. It is believed that the first representatives of the breed were imported to Britain in the 1920s, but numbers remain low until after World War II when, in 1952, the Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of Great Britain was created to promote race. The versatility, simplicity and aesthetic appeal of the Ridgeback has ensured its popularity as a show dog and companion.

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Portuguese Podengo (Warren Hound) Dog

Origin

The Portuguese Podengo is the national dog of Portugal and a very ancient breed. It is assumed that the breed was first developed there is a process of natural selection Mediterranean dogs descended from the dogs of ancient Egypt. There are three sizes of Hound: Grande (large) which is very rare, middle (middle), Little (small). These dogs have accompanied the Portuguese explorers in the 15th and 16th centuries and are therefore considered in the bottom of a large number of breeds in the world. For centuries, the small Hound has been a popular family dog, controller of the parasites and rabbit hunters in their homeland. The rabbits were an important source of food and it is likely that the breed was deliberately small in the waist that allows you to enter burrows and either direct to expel or kill the rabbits, of course, big media and capture. It is a versatile hunting dog that uses the well-tuned sense of smell, smell and sight when hunting. The breed was introduced in Britain in 2002 and was given the Kennel Club recognition in 2003. It is still considered rare outside its native country, but is becoming more widely known as a co-coupling and show dog.

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Pharaoh Hound Dog

Origin

Pharaoh Dog originated in the islands of Malta, which is known as the Kel-tal Fenek (Rabbit Hound) and is honored as the national dog of Malta. The ancestors of the Pharaoh Hound dogs were probably different Mediterranean erect ears, but the isolation of the island retains the pure-bred over the centuries. The name of the Pharaoh Hound has been awarded by the British fans, probably due to a resemblance to dogs depicted in ancient Egyptian art, and was formalized when the breed was recognized by the Kennel Club in 1974. There is no empirical evidence linking these dogs in ancient Egypt and the documentation does not mention Kalb Tal-Fenek before the 17th century. The theory that race is of more recent origin is based on DNA analysis conducted by Dr. Elaine Ostrander in 2004. The Pharaoh Hound was developed to hunt rabbits that have been, and to some extent still are, an important source of food. When hunting during the rough and rocky terrain Maltese pharaohs get the most acute hearing, keen eyesight, smell exceptionally high speed and agility. Unknown outside their country of origin to the 1960 Pharaoh Hound has achieved rapid popularity, both as a show dog and companion.

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Otterhound Dog

Origin

Otterhound origin in Britain, that its purpose is to control the number of otters that have been responsible for the depletion of fish where the fish is a staple food for humans. There is no consensus on the races have contributed to its development, but the logic seems to be the Vendée Griffon, the Griffon de Bresse and Griffon Nivernais. Otter hunting with packs of dogs has been documented since the 12th century and King Edward II (1307-1327) bears the title of Master of Otter Hounds, but probably only in 1700 the dogs have begun to resemble the modern Otterhound . A development specialist race to catch a species unique to the 20th century there was a score of around 500 packs of hounds regularly, but the number of Otterhounds decreased dramatically when the otter population has declined due to pollution of rivers and became a protected species in 1978. Some Otterhounds now used for hunting and mink hunting along the way, but in general, their numbers are few and they are officially classified as vulnerable native breed. In the world’s population is considered inferior to Otterhounds 1000.

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Irish Wolfhound Dog

Origin

The exact origin of this ancient race is lost in time but the Irish Wolfhound is supposed to be descended from dogs that accompanied the merchants of the thousands of years in the Middle East. Mentioned in the writings of the ancient Greeks and Romans favored by the ancient kings of Ireland, the subject of paintings and drawings, surrounded by myths and legends and many probably true tales of loyalty and courage through time, the greyhound Ireland is one of the most beautiful and noble members of the canine race. Bred to hunt down and kill wolves and big game and other wild boar, deer and elk Irish, its effectiveness almost spelled his downfall. In 1780, Ireland has been authorized and the number of wolves decreased Wolfhounds point of extinction, their situation was exacerbated by the famine of 1845. The resurrection of the race was conducted by Captain George A. Graham in 1862, met in a large number of other sealers he could find and began a breeding program. That goal was achieved through “pure” breeding, or to use other breeds such as Great Danes, mastiffs Deerhound and their remnants to recreate the ancient race is a matter of debate, but nevertheless, it has become a debt of gratitude. The Irish Wolfhound has been recognized by the Kennel Club as a breed of sport in 1925.

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